Posts Tagged ‘Publishing and Printing’

How Offset Printing Works Infographic

Posted Monday, February 10th, 2014 by .

How Offset Printing Works Infographic Lead In Graphic

Ever wonder how your favorite magazine is made and how so many are mass produced? We have all heard the term “offset printing,” but do you actually know what goes into that particular printing process? Find out more about how so many publications are produced before they get into your hands. Continue reading “How Offset Printing Works Infographic” »

Print-On-Demand Services Revolutionize Self-Publishing

Posted Tuesday, August 27th, 2013 by .

Boat on a BookEvery day, hundreds of new ebooks show up on Amazon and other sites from self-published authors, but many consumers still prefer to read physical books. A few print-on-demand services are stepping in to fill the gap, however, giving aspiring authors a way to get their books into the hands of readers, without the high volume or high price most large publishers require.
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Art before Inkjet

Posted Thursday, July 12th, 2012 by .

The basic principles that underlie inkjet printing are easy to understand. A series of dots comprised of inks are squirted through a printer head at a substrate — most commonly paper. The exact mechanism by which this is achieved is quite complicated, but the idea of creating images by building up patterns of dots on a surface has been around for a long time, and was frequently used by artists. This week we’re going to take a look at three artistic techniques that artists have used to create paintings and printed works in a manner analogous to the inkjet printing process.

Detail of Seurat's La Parade showing the pointillist technique.Pointillism

Most painters create images by mixing paints on a pallette until they’ve got the right color, and then applying it to their canvas with a brush in long strokes. Pointillists instead use small drops of pure colour added in a precise arrangement and proportions, which, when viewed from a distance, merge into a block of color. This is very much similar to how inkjet printing builds an image. Pointillism was first used by French post-Impressionist artist Georges Seurat in the latter half of the 19th century, and has been employed by various painters since, including Van Gogh. Modern painters like Chuck Close use the pointillist technique to achieve photorealistic results for their works.

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